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Pianists play with bass and drums.

FIND A SONG to play along with. Find your tracks by your LEVEL or by choosing what KIND of tracks you're looking for. First time here? You might want to TAKE THE TOUR.
CHOOSE YOUR LEVEL:

BEGINNING - Just starting to play jazz? These tracks are for you.

INTERMEDIATE - Been playing for awhile and ready to move beyond the simplest chord progressions? Try these tracks.

ADVANCED - These tracks will challenge you with faster tempos, more complex chord progressions and some odd meters.

WHAT KIND OF TRACKS ARE YOU LOOKING FOR?

BEBOP STANDARDS

BLUES PROGRESSIONS in 12 KEYS

BRAZILIAN STANDARDS

CLASSIC JAZZ and STANDARD TUNES

COLTRANE CHANGES

CONTEMPORARY GROOVE TRAX

DUKE TRAX 1

DUKE TRAX 2

JAM SESSION TRAX

JAZZ FUNK TRAX

LATIN JAZZ

ODD METER BASICS

RHYTHM CHANGES

SINATRA TRAX

TURNAROUNDS in 12 KEYS
What are TURNAROUNDS, anyway?
Be sure to download your FREE chart showing the chord changes for every track in each set.

Check out our FREE PlayJazzNow instructional videos.

PlayJazzNow recommends these books for PIANISTS

3 Responses to Pianists

  1. Cap says:

    I applaud your site and other endeavors to promote the “Standards” that ultimately are the measure of every great jazz player. I’m afraid many young musicians and even some educators are dismissive of the Great American Songbook as “old and irrelevant,” which is understandable to all of the musicians brought up in the era of post-Dylan music–most of it ephemeral, weak, banal country-folk-rock-fusion–and all of it employing the same “shuffle” beat (1 and 3 and/1 and 3 and/ad nauseum instead of the 4/4 walking-bass pulse that is essential to “Swing” and that is the basis of all great, memorable recorded jazz solos.)

    Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding about jazz is that it is an exclusively “African-American art form.” This has led to private donors heaping the few large private grants and awards upon a few favored, talented players and composers rather than directing it toward activities and projects that might save this music for future generations. (The reason many young people like jazz only from “Kind of Blue” on–including Miles’ fusion period of the ’70s–is that this later music does not require familiarity with the Standards for enlightenment and enjoyment.)

    From the beginning, jazz as an art form was inseparable from the popular songs of Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Richard Rodgers, George Gershwin, Jimmy McHugh, Harry Warren, Jimmy Van Heusen–so much so that, without the American popular song, there would have been no jazz (and vice versa).

    I’m afraid this indisputable reality needs to be drummed into the heads of the “funding committees” (including advisory musicians who should know better). Jazz is almost as much a Jewish-American as African-American art form (because of the disproportionate number of Jewish songwriters). But that would do injury to Cole Porter. What is needed is a PBS series on the American Popular Song comparable to the one on jazz that Ken Burns did over 15 years ago. First and foremost, the question What is the Great American Songbook? requires clarification for all to understand, especially as we celebrate the centenary of one of its foremost “creators” (Frank Sinatra).

  2. Bobby White says:

    These are the best backing tracks I’ve ever heard. I’m so happy I found this site. Your instrumentalists should offer lessons via Skype.

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